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Schedules 

 


   
 

Humour?

A three-legged dog walks into a saloon in the Old West. He slides up to the
bar and announces: "I'm looking for the man who shot my paw."

Did you hear about the Buddhist who refused his dentist's Novocain during
root canal work? Apparently, he could transcend dental medication.

** 
 

 

Don't blame me if you're not fit!

 

 

Cheer up; you can do it.

**

 

A group of chess enthusiasts checked into a hotel and were standing in the
lobby discussing their recent tournament victories. After about an hour the
manager came out of the office and asked them to disperse.
"But why?" they asked, as they moved off.
"Because," he said, "I can't stand chess nuts boasting in an open foyer."

**
 


There was a man who entered a local paper's pun contest. He sent in ten
different puns, in the hope that at least one of the puns would win.
Unfortunately, no pun in ten did.

**
A woman has twins, and gives them up for adoption. One of them goes to a
family in Egypt and is named "Amal." The other goes to a family in Spain;
they name him "Juan."  Years later, Juan sends a picture of himself to his
Mum. Upon receiving the picture, she tearfully tells her husband that she
wishes she also had a picture of Amal.  Her husband responds, "But they're
twins! If you've seen Juan, you've seen
Amal."

**


Don't blame me if you're not fit! 
 

Don't forget to cool down & stretch! You know it makes sense.
 

You can do it: let's get stuck in.
 

You do the work and I'll do the grunting. That's what I call team - work. Three days a week at this people, and you'll be on cracking form. 
 

Subject: First Aid:


 "How come you're late?" asked the bartender, as the blonde waitress walked
into the bar.

"It was awful," she explained. "I was walking down Elm street and there was
a terrible accident. A man was thrown from his car and he was lying in the
middle of the street. His leg was broken, his skull was fractured, and there
was blood everywhere. Thank God I took that first-aid course.

 "What did you do?" asked the bartender.

"I sat down and put my head between my knees to keep from fainting, without my first aid training I wouldn't have known what to do."

 

A wise head on young shoulders:
 

A duke was hunting in the forest with his men-at-arms and servants; he
came across a tree. Upon it, archery targets were painted and smack in
the middle of each was an arrow.

"Who is this incredibly fine archer?" cried the duke. "I must find
him!"

After continuing through the forest for a few miles he came across a
small boy carrying a bow and arrow. Eventually the boy admitted that
it was he who shot the arrows plumb in the center of all the targets.

"You didn't just walk up to the targets and hammer the arrows into the
middle, did you?" asked the duke worriedly.

"No my lord. I shot them from a hundred paces. I swear it by all that
I hold holy."

"That is truly astonishing," said the duke. "I hereby admit you into
my service." The boy thanked him profusely.

"But I must ask one favor in return," the duke continued. "You must
tell me how you came to be such an outstanding shot."

"Well," said the boy, "first I fire the arrow at the tree, and then I
paint the target around it."
 

Success!
 

At age 4, success is not peeing in your pants
>At age 12, success is having friends
>At age 20, success is having sex
>At age 35, success is having money
>At age 60, success is having sex
>At age 70, success is having friends
>At age 80, success is not peeing in your pants
>Life is a short circle........ENJOY!

Play on words
 

Q. Who is the greatest baby-sitter mentioned in the Bible?

A. David; he rocked Goliath to sleep.

Q. What do they call pastors in Germany?

 A. German Shepherds.

  Some examples of when and how to get started!

If you are anxious to get started go to Basic Schedule right away, but do Warm Up,  and Cool Down. To know when to exercise consider: Your Fitness Clock

Fast Full Body Workout
Here is a good free-standing schedule to get you started quickly and easily in twenty minutes.

Heart Rate

Your heart rate is an accurate measure of your performance during the aerobic session. However, it is not the only indicator of your fitness level. The resting heart rate is measured for three consecutive mornings before you get out of bed. Keep a watch or clock with a second hand to count the beats and count for 6 seconds then multiply the total 6 second count by 10. The number you get is your resting heart rate. As your cardiovascular system becomes stronger, the resting heart rate will become lower.

Your theoretical maximum heart rate (MHR), is 220 beats per minute minus your age. If you‘re 50, your maximum heart rate is 170, this should never be exceeded. If you exercise at a level that has your heart beating between 102 and 136 beats a minute (60 to 80 per cent of maximum), you‘re in the training range that induces cardiovascular system improvements; this is called the target heart rate (THR). It is wise to start at the lower end - say at 60% and gradually work up, all the while remembering that if you make it hard work and unpleasant, you won't do it for very long! Click here for Target Heart Rate Graphs.

An example calculation using the Standard Method for a 40 year old for a desired aerobic intensity of 75% would be:

Standard Target HR

= %Intensity/100 * (Maximum HR)


= 0.75 * (220 - 40)


= 135

An example calculation using the Karvonen Method for a 40 year old with a resting heart rate of 50 bpm for a desired aerobic intensity of 75% would be:

Karvonen Target HR

= %intensity/100 * (Maximum HR - Resting HR) + Resting HR


= 0.75 * (220 - 40 - 50) + 50


= 147

The heart rate should be below 120 after 2 to 5 minutes after exercise stops depending on fitness level; this is the recovery heart rate (RHR). If the heart rate is higher, insufficient cool-down or low fitness level may be the cause. Slow heart rate recovery can also be due to illness or exercising too vigorously. If this is the case, reduce the intensity of the exercise thereby adjusting the heart rate. Final heart rate check at the end of the aerobic workout should be below 100 bpm.

How do you know what your heart is doing while you're exercising? Stop and take your pulse for 6 seconds, then multiply that figure by 10 to get your beats per minute e.g. 12 beats = 120 beats per minute - just add a nought (to find your pulse, place your first and second fingers on the artery near the thumb side of the inside of your other wrist, or on your neck near the larynx). If you don‘t want to stop, you can still get a pretty good idea by monitoring your breathing. If you‘re puffing hard but not gasping, and if you‘ve broken into a sweat, you‘re probably in the lower end of the training range. If you‘re working so hard that you can‘t talk, you‘re probably in the upper range.

Factors Affecting your Heart Rate

Emotions: When you’re feeling stressed your heart rate will jump by a significant number. ie. your heart starts racing whenever you see that special someone or your heart races when you have been startled or you are anxious.

Temperature: If you’re working out in a hot climate or have a fever your heart rate will naturally be higher because it is working to supply oxygen to your muscles and body.

Posture: When you are lying down your heart rate is slower than if you were to sit up. Your heart rate when you are standing is higher than your HR when you are sitting. More energy is required of the body to stand than to lie down.

Size: Heart Rate for a person who carries more weight than the usual weight for that person will have a higher heart rate in order to supply energy to the body.

[The above short extract is from: Bodies in Motion at: http://library.thinkquest.org/]

When you first begin an exercise program and you‘re not very fit, you‘ll achieve the training range with a brisk walk or slow jogging pace. As you get fitter, however, you‘ll discover that you have to go faster to get your heart rate up to the same level.

Let's say you start your program and find that walking or jogging gets your heart rate up to 60 percent of its maximum. In a few weeks, you‘ll have to jog the whole time to reach and maintain the same heart rate. After a few weeks, you can increase speed to get more improvement from your cardiovascular system. It's quite fun and very interesting; it can become an absorbing and rewarding hobby. If you can afford it, a heart monitor is a very useful aid and makes the task of monitoring your heart a simple one. Your heart rate is the equivalent of the speedometer in a car; your energy output or effort is the accelerator and brake combined. Exceeding the limit is un-necessary and unwise, working below the limit is of little use to you - you'll get there but very slowly, always bearing in mind, that any exercise is good exercise

It is not a good idea to go from a standing start to vigorous exercise and back again. You should ease into exercise with a five-minute warm-up and a stretching routine:

Target Heart Rate Graphs

Target Heart Rate Chart

AGE

BEGINNER
60%-70%

INTERMEDIATE
70%-80%

ADVANCED
80%-90%


Beats/min

Beats/10 sec

Beats/min

Beats/10 sec

Beats/min

Beats/10 sec

up to 19

120 - 140

20 - 24

138 - 155

23 - 25

150 - 174

25 - 29

20 - 24

120 - 140

20 - 24

138 - 155

23 - 25

144 - 174

24 - 29

25 - 29

115 - 137

18 - 22

135 - 152

22 - 25

144 - 166

24 - 29

30 - 34

110 - 133

18 - 22

131 - 147

21 - 24

138 - 162

23 - 27

35 - 39

110 - 130

18 - 21

128 - 142

21 - 23

136 - 160

22 - 26

40 - 44

96 - 126

16 - 21

124 - 139

20 - 23

128 - 151

21 - 25

45 - 49

96 - 123

16 - 20

121 - 135

20 - 22

126 - 146

21 - 25

50 - 54

90 - 119

15 - 19

117 - 132

19 - 22

120 - 142

20 - 23

55 - 59

90 - 116

15 - 19

114 - 130

19 - 21

110 - 139

18 - 23

60 +

90 - 112

15 - 18

110 - 127

18 - 21

100 - 134

16 - 22

Design by SkyTerm Web FX
(c) 1995, 2000 by IFA www.ifafitness.com

The Warm-Up:

The warm up is a vital part of any exercise program. Be it running, aerobics,  swimming or any kind of activity that requires your body to work you will need to warm up. Then again, you may ask: Why warm up? Well, for one thing, warming up lubricates your joints and lubricated joints helps you to move better and that prepares your body for the intense movement of the exercise. Warming up gets your heart to pump more blood and take in more oxygen. If you start exercising without warming up you risk injuries (for example: pulling a muscle) that could have easily been prevented if you took the time to warm up.

Usually a warm-up should be five to ten minutes long and it should be cardiovascular activity, to get your heart pumping more blood, and light stretching, to prepare your muscles for the intense movement of the workouts. Light stretching during the warm-up will loosen the muscle so you can move easily. When you warm up you increase the internal temperature of your body which will increase your mechanical efficiency, make you less vulnerable to injuries and allow for a greater range of motion. 

 And when you have finished your workout then ease out of it with a five-minute cool-down: 

The Cool Down:

If you had to miss one of the three main components of your exercise routine it's highly recommended that you DO NOT skip the cool-down. "Why?", you ask. Well here's why: the cool-down is your recovery phase where you start to recover from the workout you just finished. It is guaranteed that if you do not cool down and stretch after a strenuous workout you will be in a lot of pain for the next couple of days. Cool-Down - the title speaks for itself, but it is still worth explaining a little more in depth. After your workout comes the cool-down; you start to breathe a little slower, lifting less weight and simply cooling down. Once you have lowered your heart rate you stretch all your muscles - paying special attention to the muscles you've just worked. Each stretch should last for at least eight seconds and naturally you should hold the stretch a little longer and repeat it if the muscle feels particularly sore. Don't over do the stretching; stretch until you feel some mild tension in the muscle - stretching shouldn't hurt.

With 20 minutes of work in your training heart range in between, you will now have done a total of 30 minutes of exercise . This a the framework of a basic workout schedule, all that has to be added is the actual exercises to be carried out.

This is called 'The Workout'. Start with 3-5 minute warm up - try gently running on the spot or walking up and down the stairs. Set the pace at a moderate intensity (you should feel as if you're working moderately hard, but can still able to carry on a conversation). Maintain this pace for the full 3-5 minutes, followed by a modest stretching routine as follows:

Stretch the main muscle groups: arms, legs, chest, back, sides - holding each stretch to a point of mild tension for 10-15 seconds without bouncing.

Next, you'll do a total-body strength-training routine.

If you have little or no equipment, just be creative when setting up your exercise stations! These may all be in the same position if you don't use any apparatus, or if you lack space. You can get an effective total-body workout relying solely on your own body weight. A circuit comprised of exercises such as push-ups, squats, abdominal curls and calf raises requires no equipment whatsoever and delivers a useful resistance workout

.

Muscular Endurance Workout

Try to alternate between upper body and lower body on separate days: upper body on Monday, lower body Wednesday and upper body again on Friday, starting again with lower body the following Monday and so on. Incorporate the abdominal and back exercises into each schedule. 

Below is an example of an equipment-free schedule. If desired, use makeshift weights or household substitutes (the tinned food cans already mentioned, or a broom handle  for example) for additional resistance.

Repeat the exercise in each station for 15-30 seconds, with 10-seconds in between to move to the next exercise station. Remember that the timing may vary depending on your fitness level. Begin with an adequate warm-up, perform the workout, then cool-down and stretch.

Here is an example of a basic schedule (adapt to your own requirements) see the Exercises section for exercise details.

                                                               

Monday  

Wednesday

  Friday

10 - arm curls 10  - squats 10 - arm curls
10  - trunk curls   10  - trunk curls   10  - trunk curls  
10  -  upright rowing 10  - calve raises      10  -  upright rowing
10  - side to side bend  10  - side to side bend  10  - side to side bend 
10  - triceps dip       10  - forward lunge 10  - triceps dip       
10 - low back extension  10  - low back extension  10  - low back extension 
10  - side to side twist 10  - side to side twist 10  - side to side twist
10  - half push up 10  - leg curls 10  - half push up
10 - abdom half crunch 10 - abdom half crunch 10 - abdom half crunch

              Repeat schedule 2 or 3 times, dependent upon how fit you are.

Now you have a basic exercise schedule, which can be added to as you improve your strength and fitness. More to follow.

Webmaster's personal schedule: (in 2000)

This is done at the local Fitness Centre three days a week, alternating upper and lower body. If there is anything that requires clarification, please ask. This can be adapted to your own requirements, but it is for the more advanced among you. The weights section is an ascending pyramid, with a corresponding reduction in repetitions. The chart is an auto-calculating MS Excel sheet. 
 

Upper Body

 

 

 

 

Date:

20-Sep

(adjusted)

BMI

26.13

Weight: kilos

79.9

77.6

BP

116/64

Working heart rate:

120 - 142 (60% - 85%)

(Karvonen)

STONES

12.22

Exercise:

 

 

 

 

Warm up: minutes

 

Time - mins

Weight - kg

Calories

Cycle

 

 

 

 

Cross trainer

5

5

 

40

Run

 

 

 

 

Stepper

 

 

 

 

 CV

 

 

 

 

Cross trainer

 

 

 

 

Calories burned

 

 

Max Pulse

 

Cycle

20

20

129

200

Distance - kms

9.1

 

 

 

Rowing

20

20

127

200

Distance - metres

4956

 

 

 

Stepper

 

 

 

 

Height - metres

 

 

 

 

Run

 

 

 

 

Distance - kms

 

 

 

 

Warm down:

 

 

 

 

Cross trainer

5

5

 

10

Walk

 

 

 

 

Cycle

 

 

 

 

Stepper

 

 

 

 

Stretch:

10 + 5

15

 

5

Arms:

 

 

 

 

Press ups - number

3*30

 

 

 

Arm curls - kgs

20*10+15*15+10*20

5

625

50

Lat pull-down - kgs

20*35+15*45+10*50

5

2325

50

Tricep pushdown

20*15+15*15+10*15

5

675

50

Bench press

20*30+15*35+10*40

5

1875

50

Pec deck

20*20+15*25+10*30

5

1300

50

Shoulder press

20*15+15*20+10*25

5

850

50

Upright rowing

20*10+15*15+10*20

5

625

50

Abdoms:

 

 

 

 

Fixed leg sit up - bench

 

 

 

 

Obliques - fixed leg

 

 

 

 

Free sit up - bench

3 x 20 alternate

5

 

25

Obliques - free

3 x 20

5

 

25

Crunches - machine

 

 

 

 

Obliques - machine

3 x 20 alternate

5

 

25

Sit ups - machine

3 x 20

5

 

25

Other:

 

 

 

 

Dorsal raises

3 x 20

5

 

25

Rest periods

 

15

 

 

Totals:

140

8531

930

 

 

 

 

 

Lower Body

Date:

22-Sep

(adjusted)

BMI

25.96

Weight: kilograms

79.40

77.10

BP

120/70

Working heart rate:

120 - 142 (60% - 85%)

(Karvonen)

STONES

12.14

Exercise

Warm up: minutes

Time-mins

Weight-kgs

Calories

Cycle

Cross trainer

5

5

25

Run

Stepper

 CV:

Cross trainer

Max Pulse

Calories burned

(Spike)

Cycle

20

20

131

200

Distance - kms

8.9

Rowing

20

20

128

200

Distance - metres

4876

Stepper

Height - metres

Walk - brisk

Distance - miles

Warm down:

Cross trainer

Walk

5

5

25

Cycle

Stepper

Stretch: minutes

5 + 5

10

5

Dips

3*10

5

50

Pull ups

3*10

5

50

Legs

Leg extension 

20*25+15*35+10*45

5

1475

50

Leg curl

20*25+15*35+10*45

5

1475

50

Adduction

20*60+15*70+10*80

5

3225

50

Abduction

20*60+15*70+10*80

5

3225

50

Leg press 

20*60+15*80+10*100

5

3400

50

Calf press 

20*60+15*80+10*100

5

3400

50

Abdoms:

Fixed leg sit up 

Obliques - fixed leg

Free sit up - bench

3 x 20

5

50

Obliques - free

3 x 20 alternate

5

50

Crunches -free

Obliques - machine

3 x 20

5

50

Sit ups - machine

3 x 20 alternate

5

50

Other

Lateral bends - alt

20*15+15*20+10*25

5

1025

50

Dorsal raises

3 x 20

5

25

Rest periods

15

Totals:

145

17484

1130

If you need help now, e mail the Webmaster
 


The Busy Woman's 20-Minute Workout

The key to this routine is to keep moving for the entire 20 minutes, so try to segue quickly from set to set without wasting any time on the sidelines. Before you begin, there's one must: Any good workout starts with a warm-up. Since you don't have a gymnasium to run laps around, go for the more space-efficient technique of running or marching in place – or use the stairs. After a few minutes, your heart rate should be up and your muscles warm enough to start exercising. Now let's begin ...

1. NARROW PUSH-UP -- 1 MINUTE
Start with the tough stuff: This exercise will work your chest, shoulders, and triceps (the muscles at the backs of your upper arms). Assume a knees-on-the-floor, feet-crossed push-up position, but move your hands together so your thumbs and index fingers touch (as shown here). The space between your hands should form a triangle. This variation gives your triceps a better workout than a basic push-up. (To further challenge yourself, use your feet, rather than your knees, for support; to ease up, position your hands under your shoulders, a little wider than shoulder-width apart.) Complete as many push-ups as you can in 1 minute. It's okay to rest when you need to.

2. DOOR SQUAT -- 2 MINUTES
This exercise will tone your hamstrings (the muscles in the backs of your thighs), quadriceps (the muscles at the fronts of your thighs), and butt. First, open a sturdy door (make sure it's firmly hinged) and loop a towel around each knob. Hold both ends of the towel in your hands. Stand with your arms fully extended in front of you and your feet shoulder-width apart. Keeping your back straight, squat until the tops of your thighs are almost parallel to the floor. Be sure to keep your weight firmly over your heels. Now rise to the standing position. That's 1 repetition. Do a total of 20 repetitions. Next spread your feet slightly wider than hip-width, turning your feet so that they point slightly away from each other. Now do 20 more reps.

3. THE ALTERNATE ARM LEG -- 1 MINUTE

Lie face down on a mat with your arms extended over your head. Raise your right arm and left leg simultaneously until you feel gentle tension in your lower back. Resist twisting your torso or raising your other hip or shoulder at the same time. Hold for 5 seconds, and then slowly lower. Repeat using your other arm and leg. Complete the series as many times as you can in 1 minute.

4. RUNNING IN PLACE/JACKS -- 1 MINUTE
Alternating a few sets of calisthenics with an aerobic interval helps keep your heart rate elevated throughout the routine. For this set of aerobic moves, run in place for 30 seconds, then immediately do 15 jumping jacks or half star jumps.

5. REVERSE LUNGE -- 2 MINUTES
This move will help firm your butt and legs. Stand straight with your hands on your hips. Keeping your left leg straight, step back with your left foot as far as you can; then lower your left knee until it nearly touches the floor, or as low as you can. Your right knee should automatically bend to a 90-degree angle. Lift yourself back into the starting position, tightening your butt muscles as you go. Repeat 10 to 15 times with your left leg, and then work your right leg.

6. ONE-LEGGED CALF RAISE -- 2 MINUTES
Stand with your left forefoot on the edge of a step so that your left heel hangs off the edge. Wrap your right foot around your left ankle and grab a railing or wall for balance. Rise up onto your toes, and then slowly lower yourself until your heel falls slightly below the step. Repeat 12 to 20 times, and then switch to work the right leg. (If you don't have a step, you can just lift yourself off the floor. This variation won't challenge your calf muscles as much, so try holding yourself in the raised position for a 2-second count.)

7. LATERAL RAISE -- 2 MINUTES
Stand straight with your left hand on your hip and a weight or heavy book (a dictionary, the phone book, whatever) in your right hand. Slowly lift your right arm out to the side until it's parallel to the floor. Hold for a second, and then slowly lower it back to your side. Repeat 12 to 20 times, and then switch sides.

8. SHOULDER RAISE -- 1 MINUTE
Stand with your arms straight out from your sides, parallel to the floor. Slowly rotate both arms forward as if you were drawing 6-inch-diameter circles with your fingertips. Continue for 30 seconds, and then draw backward circles for 30 seconds.

9. LEG LIFT -- 3 MINUTES
This exercise targets the hamstrings and buttocks. Get down on your hands and knees. Press your left knee forward, and then slowly extend the leg behind you until it's in line with your back. Lower your leg slowly, and again press the knee forward. Do 20 repetitions with each leg.

10. CRUNCH -- 3 MINUTES
Start with a basic crunch to work your upper abdominals: Lie on your back, knees bent, feet flat on the floor, hands lightly touching the back of your head, elbows out. Keeping your lower back pressed to the floor, slowly curl your head and shoulders up, then lower them back down. Do as many repetitions as you can in 1 minute.

Next, add a twist to work your oblique muscles: As you lift, twist your upper body to bring your right shoulder toward your left knee. Then twist to the right, drawing your left shoulder toward your right knee. Alternate from side to side for as many repetitions as you can for 1 minute. Then work the lower abdominals with reverse crunches. Lift your knees so your shins are parallel to the floor. Then slowly curl your knees toward your chest, pressing your lower back into the floor and your navel toward your spine. Lower again and repeat for 1 minute.

11. COOL-DOWN -- 2 MINUTES
On completion, don't just collapse onto the couch and grab the remote. Cool down and stretch first to keep your muscles from getting sore. Start by walking for 2 minutes or so, until your heart rate slows and your breathing returns to normal. Finish with a few good stretches, like these:

For your hamstrings: Lie on your back with your left leg bent and left foot flat on the floor. Lift your right leg straight up, clasp your hands behind your right thigh, and gently stretch the leg toward your chest. Repeat with your left leg.

For your quadriceps: Steadying yourself against a wall with your right hand, bend your left knee, grab your foot with your left hand, and pull your heel toward your buttocks. Stand as straight as possible as you stretch. Repeat with your right leg.

For your shoulders and arms: Clasp your hands behind your back and draw your shoulder blades together as close as is comfortable.

Copyright © 1998-2002 SLM & Healthy Living
All Rights Reserved

 

Fitness Round the Clock

This is your big time body clock - do you know what your best time of day to work out is? The worse time is usually about 1 pm, the best first thing in the morning or straight after work!


When to exercise!

1:00 p.m. Trough time  Your mental alertness is flagging and even though your body temperature is still on the rise, you're likely to feel a little muzzy. Scientists say this energy trough has nothing to do with lunch — though a big one can exacerbate that drowsy feeling. Don't call a meeting now unless you want your co-workers to snooze through it.

3:00 p.m. You're a genius, again!  Your mental acuity has rebounded from its one o'clock low. Since the muscles in your body are warming up to their 24-hour peak, your handshake is actually firmer. You (and everyone around you) are likely to feel better than you have all day. Quick! Corner that co-worker who owes you a favour or ask the boss for that raise.

4:00 p.m. The power hour  If you're out to set a land speed record, now's the time. All day your body has been building to this moment — temperature is at its peak, strength is soaring, air passages are clearest and fine motor skills are at their most precise. This might be a good time to test your limits with some late-day sprints. It is suggested that walkers and runners try these one-minute pickup speed bouts once or twice a week.

After a good warm-up, set out for a walk or run. Pick up the pace for a full minute, pushing your heart rate up. Drop back to an easier pace for three or four minutes, or as long as it takes your breathing and heart rate to settle. Once you've recovered, pick up the pace again for a minute, and then recover again. (Keep the changes of pace fluid.) Start with one or two speed bouts in a half-hour walk or run and, as you get stronger, work toward four or five. Allow muscles at least 48 hours to recover between speed sessions.

5:00 p.m. Ozone alert  Concentrations of ozone are at their highest now, particularly when rush hour exhaust saturates a sunny, windless sky. Breathing space isn't so great at the gym either, since the after-work surge usually means a wait list for spinning (the in expression for CV work) class. Better to take a deep breath at your desk, make tomorrow's to-do list and relieve today's tension with a seated twist, a near yoga pose.

 

 


Sit in a chair, keep your back straight. Slowly twist left, holding the chair back with your left hand. Breathing, twisting, feel the gentle tension release from your spine. Chin up, turn your head to follow. Untwist slowly. Repeat right.

Now it's decision time - can you summon the energy to go to the gym, go for a run or do a workout at home? Most people intend to, but in the event normally change their mind once they get home. It's worth making the effort - but it is a hard discipline!

 

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Copyright © 2000 Fitnwell, UK
Wednesday September 08, 2010 12:43:13

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This is the home of Physical Training & Fitness - 'Fitnwell' - It is hoped that you enjoy your time here and that you find something of interest. Do let me know if you have any queries, and also your feedback.